Where to eat authentic Korean food in Montréal

Jason Lee

Jason is a food eater and picture taker. As the blogger behind Shut Up and Eat, he covers everything food, from recipes to reviews. Jason has vowed that he will not stop until he has officially eaten his way across Montréal. It’s a big claim, and it’s one he’s making.

Montréal has a happening Asian food scene and Korean cuisine is well-represented. From family-style restaurants to do-it-yourself barbecue and casual student-centric eateries, the choices are vast. If you’re looking for killer kalbi or monster mandu, here are some places to check out.

Like omma used to make

What’s better than a home-cooked meal by mom (omma)? Restaurant Hwang-Kum is a great option for a taste of home. It serves the best haemul pajeon in the city—a wok-fried pancake stuffed with seafood, scallions and shredded vegetables. Mon Ami is another solid option with multiple locations for traditional Korean food. You’ll find classic dishes on the menu, from stews and soups to grilled meats. Located in the heart of Chinatown, Chez Bong has been a crowd pleaser for years serving up hits like japchae – a stir-fried noodle salad and jajangmyeon (noodles with black bean sauce).

Where there’s smoke, there’s BBQ

Korean cuisine is synonymous with table-top grilling. With a variety of meats, vegetables and awesome side-dishes (kimchi and different pickles), Korean barbecue is a definite hit with everyone. Seoul BBQ offers an authentic experience and is popular amongst the Korean community. Check out Seoul Chako or Sota BBQ in the heart of downtown – located across the street from each other -  for their all-you-can-eat (or grill) menu and late-night menu available until 2:30 am. Kalbi Korean BBQ in Chinatown offers an all-you-can-eat option as well that includes sushi.

KFC – Korean Fried Chicken

If you’ve never had authentic KFC, then these restaurants are a great place to start. DaWa is the original Korean fried chicken hot spot in Montréal. This modest little eatery offers a handful of varieties, but most notable is the “Korean Tao”—a Korean version of General Tao chicken. Off the beaten path, located in Verdun, Comon offers six different kinds of fried chicken – order the chicken in sweet sauce topped with scallions. Restaurant The Basak’s logo features the words “crispy chicken & beer”. Take a wild guess at what it specializes in; that’s right, a good time.

Quick bites

If you’re looking for something more casual, there are some great options of Korean quick bites around the city. GaNaDaRa, located right by Concordia University, is a hip and happening restaurant in the Shaughnessy Village. Get the tobboki poutine or any of the ramyun (instant noodles). Sam Cha often sees lineups at peak hours, but the food is worth the wait. Stone bowl rice dishes and stews are available but get the DIY specials. BBQ, chulpan (mixed rice) and JeonGol (hot pot) meals for two people are a fun way to dine between friends. Opiano is an ultra low-key casual spot steps from McGill University with counter-style ordering. It’s got the classics on its menu: pork rib soup, budae-jiggae “army stew” and kimbap, to name a few. Lunch specials and bento boxes are a hit amongst the students and office crowd.

Jason Lee

Jason is a food eater and picture taker. As the blogger behind Shut Up and Eat, he covers everything food, from recipes to reviews. Jason has vowed that he will not stop until he has officially eaten his way across Montréal. It’s a big claim, and it’s one he’s making.

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